Театральные обзоры

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07.05.2013
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Las Pastorelas. A Centuries Old Christmas Tradition

AUTHOR | ANGELICA GALICIA

In Mexico, Christmas is the best season of the year. With the fiesta-loving, lively nature that sets us apart, we Mexicans have styled this religious celebration very much in our own fashion. So much so that perhaps no where else in the world do so many traditions exist to celebrate it, from asking for room at the inn, to remembering the road Mary and Joseph took to Bethlehem, to piñatas, those big star-shaped clay and cardboard figures that are smashed with…

10.03.2013
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Elen

Robert Beltran. Passionately, Piazzolla!

Из журнала Tucson Lifestyle, выпуск февраль 2013

Время - это танго! Роберт Белтран представляет жизнь аргентинского композитора Астора Пьяццоллы в постановке по пьесе Гарри Кларка, которая объединяет живую музыку и танцы в исполнении труппы балета Тусона.

"Эта пьеса не только своего рода биографический очерк, но и исследование творчества композитора" - объясняет Белтран.

 
 
06.01.2013
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Elen

Robert Beltran. The Big Knife

Интервью с Робертом Белтраном (фрагмент)

20 декабря 2003 в интернет-трансляция Шоу Ларуша состоялась беседа с актером и режиссером Робертом Белтраном после его постановки пьесы Клиффорда Одетса «Большой нож» 1948 года.

Диалог вел Харли Шлангер. Эфир этого интервью транслировался 9 января 2004 года.

 

02.12.2012
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Photo: Solitude

LA STAGE TIMES | 08.09.2011 | ASHLEY STEED

The play is about a group of people who come together to pay the respects to the mother of Gabriel. “What resumes is a psycho-drama comedy as these people set their lives out,” says Robert Beltran who plays The Man. “The catalyst is the death of the mother. They begin to reflect on their life and what death means and what living really means.” In other words, “What’s it all about?”

So just who is this mysterious character, The Man? “He’s the limo driver who has taken these characters to and from the funeral. And he’s invited himself into the reception.” Also, he’s “an expert on Octavio Paz and other philosophers. He offers advice to two of the men – advice on romance and women.” In the end, though, he receives a very valuable lesson.

02.12.2012
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Photo: Solitude

Los Angeles Downtown News | 11.09.2011 | Richard Guzmán

When Evelina Fernandez was searching for a topic for her next play, she settled on the issue of alcoholism. Then, after talking to an actor friend who reminded her of a quote about drinking by the Mexican writer Octavio Paz in his famed book Labyrinth of Solitude, she changed course.

"What Octavio Paz said was, ‘Mexicans drink to confess and Americans drink to forget,’" said Fernandez. The line helped inspire Solitude, which premiered Sept. 9 and runs...

 
02.12.2012
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Photo: Solitude

LOS ANGELES TIMES | 17.07.2011 | MARGARET GRAY

Twenty years earlier, Gabriel abandoned the warmth and poverty of his childhood for financial success and emotional isolation in a childless marriage to beautiful, lonely Sonia (Lucy Rodríguez). It’s apparent early on that Ramona’s son, the confused and moody 25-year-old Angel (Fidel Gomez), is Gabriel’s son too, and that this revelation will emotionally tax both the characters and the audience. I found myself glancing at my neighbor’s watch as the climax loomed, wondering how much time and how many tears I would have to invest in it. (More than enough.)

02.12.2012
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Photo: Solitude

LOS ANGELES TIMES | 24.09.2009 | F. KATHLEEN FOLEY

Swelling with art, heart and high style, “Solitude,” a Latino Theater Company production at the Los Angeles Theatre Center, examines the human imperatives of love in all its painful permutations.

Evelina Fernández’s world-premiere play was largely inspired by Octavio Paz’s “The Labyrinth of Solitude,” a landmark work positing that the conflict between Mexico’s indigenous and Spanish cultures had split the collective Mexican psyche in two, with an outward “mask” of conviviality concealing inner despair.

02.12.2012
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Poster: Quartered Man

LOS ANGELES TIMES | 25.12.1985 | SYLVIE DRAKE

Donald Freed can't resist political controversy. He has to grab hold, noodle it, needle it, toss it around, try it for size, inject it with his own neopolitical dye the better to expose it.

He's done this with great brio in one-on-one fictions such as "Secret Honor," "The White Crow," "Circe and Bravo." It works less well when the canvas he tackles is larger--as in "The Quartered Man," which opened Monday at the Los Angeles Theatre Center's Bradley Theatre. Here the brush strokes are so thick and heavy, so clever, fast and furious that they obfuscate the painting.

The subject is close to all of our nervous systems: CIA involvement in Nicaragua. The anti-hero is a career secret agent, George O'Connor (John Carter), in San Jose, Costa Rica, who is ready to crack. The pressure? Call it patriotic expectations vs. job requirements--or reality therapy as the systematic erosion of self-respect.

02.12.2012
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La Pastorela

JUMP CUT | June 1993 | KATHLEEN NEWMAN

On December 23, 1991, the Public Broadcasting System aired EL TEATRO CAMPESINO'S LA PASTORELA: A SHEPHERD'S TALE as the seventh new program of the season in its Great Performances series.[1][open notes in new window] El Teatro Campesino, an internationally renown theater troupe, has presented bilingual theatrical versions of the pastorela at the San Bautista Mission in California since 1975. The decision to make a television special of the pastorela signals a new phase in the cultural politics of the Teatro, one of the most interesting aspects of which is the appropriation of an explicitly latina activist discourse to combat a monolithic concept of our national culture, a concept inherent in the Great Performances series, as we shall see below, despite the obvious commitment to diversity of the producers of the series.

01.12.2012
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Poster: Burning Beach

LOS ANGELES TIMES | 06.02.1989 | DAN SULLIVAN

Playwright Eduardo Machado's family came to the United States after the Castro revolution, when he was only 8 years old. Naturally, Cuba is a magical island to Machado and his characters. The aunt in his "Broken Eggs" (1984) even imagines that her "second self" is still living down there.

Machado's new play at the Los Angeles Theatre Center, "A Burning Beach," is set in the twice-mythical Cuba of the past. The time is 1895. Two well-brought-up sisters have just lost their sinful Papa, and who is to take charge of the plantation now?

Also figuring in the story are their black maid, with whom their father sinned; their half brother, the result of the sin; a beautiful and seductive American girl who claims to be related to Teddy Roosevelt; and the young leader of the first Cuban independence movement, Jose Marti.

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